Eugene Rabkin is the founder of stylezeitgeist.com. He has contributed articles on fashion and culture to The Business of Fashion, Vogue Russia, Buro247, the Haaretz Daily Newspaper, and other publications. He has taught critical writing and fashion writing courses at Parsons the New School for Design.

SZ10 Pop-Up Shop Products – Part 1

As part of StyleZeitgeist’s 10th anniversary celebration I decided to open a pop-up shop in New York City. So much of what we do is digital that I thought it’s time we should do something in 3D. The pop-up shop will take place at the new Atelier New York location in Greenwich village and will open this Saturday at noon. I will try to be on site for most of the time, so feel free to stop in and say hi.

A1923 Personalized Footwear at SZ10 Pop-Up

As part of the StyleZeitgeist 10th Anniversary pop-up shop and in conjunction with Atelier New York, we are helping launch the personalized footwear program by A19123. For the first time ever customers will be able to order three classic A1923 styles in fabrication and color they desire.

On September 13th, from 6-8 p.m. the A1923 designer Simone Cecchetto will be on site in order to guide customers through the available choices. If you miss the launch, you will still be able to order a custom pair of A1923 footwear at Atelier, exclusively in New York City. A1923 will subsequently roll out the program in select boutiques worldwide.

As part of the StyleZeitgeist 10th Anniversary pop-up shop, we collaborated on the 2-piece capsule collection with the Australian label Song For the Mute, whose work we have championed since the label's inception. The collaboration combines the signature structure of Song for the Mute garments with a custom fabric developed exclusively for this collaboration. The handmade Japanese fabric execution of the Raised Neck Coat is a homage to the Peter Saville’s iconic ‘Unknown Pleasures’ album artwork for the post-punk band Joy Division.

Song for the Mute x StyleZeitgeist

As part of the StyleZeitgeist 10th Anniversary pop-up shop, we collaborated on the 2-piece capsule collection with the Australian label Song For the Mute, whose work we have championed since the label’s inception. The collaboration combines the signature structure of Song for the Mute garments with a custom fabric developed exclusively for this collaboration. The handmade Japanese fabric execution of the Raised Neck Coat is a homage to the Peter Saville’s iconic ‘Unknown Pleasures’ album artwork for the post-punk band Joy Division.

Rick Owens New York Store Opening

This past weekend Rick Owens reopened his New York boutique on the corner of Crosby and Howard streets in Manhattan. This particular stretch of SoHo has exploded this year with the opening of the 11 Howard hotel and the adjacent interior design shop Oliver Gustav (which coincidentally carries furniture by Rick Owens). The former textile factory building was previously occupied by a Jil Sander store, and has undergone extensive renovations to reflect Owens’s universe.

StyleZeitgeist Pop-Up in New York

As part of our 10th anniversary celebration we will open a pop-up shop inside the new storefront location of Atelier New York. We will carry exclusive items from many designers we have supported over the years and who have graciously agreed to create exclusive products for the shop. All of the products are either new styles or have been customized in some way. Most come in limited editions of three to five pieces. Some come in editions of ten or eleven. In the coming days we will begin releasing product imagery. I will try my best to be at the pop-up every day, so come and say hi.

Gus Van Sant: Icons

The director Gus Van Sant is one of those creators synonymous with the youth culture of the 90s, when the fringes hit the mainstream. The Drugstore Cowboy (ok, it came out in ‘89, but you know what I mean) and especially My Own Private Idaho (’91) made him more than an instant cult figure. And if his later releases like Gerry, Last Days, and Paranoid Park, did not seem as impactful, perhaps it’s because the youth culture that changed and not the man.

Undercover

Undercover Monograph

It is hard to believe that that the perennially young Japanese label UNDERCOVER turned 25 last year. As part of the anniversary, the publisher Rizzoli is releasing a 256-page book on the brand ($65). It is the first comprehensive overview of UNDERCOVER’s body of work and the first book on the brand available in the West (if you can find it, hunt down the fantastic “The Shepherd,” which documented UNDERCOVER’s first Parisian shows.)