Katsu Naito: Day Trip

In Volume 5 of our print magazine, we profiled New York City photographer Katsu Naito and his 2011 photobook, Westside Rendezvous, which is comprised of several Meatpacking District streetscapes but mostly portraits of transgender prostitutes that plied their trade there in the afternoons of the late 80s and early 90s.

Ryoji Ikeda at the Met Museum

For two days only, Septhember 6th and 7th, the groundbreaking Japanese visual and sound artist Ryoji Ikeda premieres his new work, supercodex [liveset], at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. The performance is based on his eponymous 2013 album. The final installment of his album trilogy, supercodex [liveset] explores the relationship between data and sound through rhythmic and raw samplings from his earlier albums and hypnotic, enveloping audiovisual installations. If you missed his epic immersive installation “THE TRANSFINITE” at the Park Avenue Armory, this is a good chance to catch up. Tickets are $45.

HYOMEN BY KENSAKU KAKIMOTO

In art, the tension between artistic expression and commercial work is nothing new. Every artist dreams of being unfettered by commercial constraints; some good ones get to pour their creativity into commercial work; for the lucky few it can even pave a path to art (James Rosenquist is one famous example). The Japanese cnematographer Kensaku Kakimoto has found commercial success early on in his career. At only 34, he has already created a slew of videos for some of the biggest Japanese and international brands like Toyota and Coca-Cola. He has also produced three feature films in Japan.

Rick Owens: Furniture

This past December, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles put on an exhibit of Rick Owens’s furniture. If you missed the show, which closed on April 2nd, you can still get the belatedly released book that provides a glimpse into that part of Owens’s oeuvre

Robert Rauschenberg at Tate Modern

If art is supposed to reflect the world around us, than the American artist Robert Rauschenberg is an artist par excellence. Rauschenberg was one of the most important artists in the burgeoning, energetic New York art scene of the mid-2oth Century. His ability to gather materials from the dilapidated, grim streets of New York and morphing them into art remains unparalleled, and his influence on the likes of Andy Warhol, who was heavily influenced by Rauschenberg’s silk-screening techniques, is undeniable.

Deborah Turbeville at Deborah Bell

As you might know if you follow the output of this magazine closely, the photographer Deborah Turbeville holds a special place in our hearts. I interviewed her for the second print volume of this magazine, and we published the profile posthumously on our website, with a slew of original photographs of her apartment. So, I was delighted to see a new exhibit of her photographs in New York, in the gallery of Deborah Bell, no less.