Iris van Herpen: Backstage

The intrepid Dutch designer Iris van Herpen, well known by now for pushing the boundaries of what’s possible, has released her third book, Iris van Herpen: Backstage. Unlike her two previous books and as evident from the title, this time we get a chance to peek into what’s going on backstage before van Herpen’s shows. The soft cover 144-page tome (EUR 29.50) with photos by Morgan O’Donovan is published by Wilteveen+Bos and is available on the designer’s website.

Iris van Herpen: Transforming Fashion

Early last year the Atlanta High Museum of Art brought an unprecedentedly large-scale exhibit of the work of the Dutch designer Iris van Herpen to the United States (our coverage here). The wildly successful show titled Iris van Herpen: Transforming Fashion is taking a North American tour with the first stop at the Grand Rapids Art…

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Iris Van Herpen

The new fashion exhibit Manus x Machina at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York explores the relationship between fashion made by hand and by machine. One of its sub themes is the marriage of the most traditional handwork couture methods and the most advanced technological methods of clothes-making. Amongst its selection are seven dresses by the Dutch designer Iris van Herpen, who stands peerless in doing just that.

There is a depth to her work that results in garments that are often called “otherworldly” or “futuristic,” though van Herpen will be the first to tell you that she sees them firmly rooted in reality. Another misconception, perpetuated by the fashion media that runs after trendy stories and by the general media that runs after sensationalist ones, is that van Herpen’s work centers on 3D printing. In reality, her work traverses a wide variety of techniques and materials in service only to two things; to give free reign to van Herpen’s imagination, and to transcend fashion itself.

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Manus X Machina at The Met

This week the new fashion exhibition “Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology” opens at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. It aims to challenge the notion, usually found in the popular imagination, that handwork and machine work somehow exist in the state of opposition.