Camp: Notes on Fashion at the Met Museum

The new exhibit by the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Camp: Notes on Fashion, is fraught on many levels, starting with a paradoxical nature of its theme. On the surface (no pun intended) Camp is not hard to spot because it’s so image-oriented. In reality the playfulness and irony inherent to Camp makes it elusive and intuitive. Like any sensibility or a matter of taste, Camp requires from its audience organic growth and (self)education. You can’t really stuff all of these things into a museum exhibit that is aimed at the general public – and the job of the Met is to cater to the general public. It’s especially hard to do because Camp is a fairly niche sensibility – there is something subcultural and underground in it. Camp takes pleasure in being stuck into people’s faces without them getting it. Really, it’s kind of the point.

Ryoji Ikeda at the Met Museum

For two days only, Septhember 6th and 7th, the groundbreaking Japanese visual and sound artist Ryoji Ikeda premieres his new work, supercodex [liveset], at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. The performance is based on his eponymous 2013 album. The final installment of his album trilogy, supercodex [liveset] explores the relationship between data and sound through rhythmic and raw samplings from his earlier albums and hypnotic, enveloping audiovisual installations. If you missed his epic immersive installation “THE TRANSFINITE” at the Park Avenue Armory, this is a good chance to catch up. Tickets are $45.

iris van herpen manus x machina 9

Manus X Machina at The Met

This week the new fashion exhibition “Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology” opens at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. It aims to challenge the notion, usually found in the popular imagination, that handwork and machine work somehow exist in the state of opposition.